The Unfortunate Art of the “Thank You” Note

January 17th, 2013 § 0 comments

In many situations today, a “thank you note” may be extraneous given the circumstances of a particular interview process. If you’re meeting the same individual for a second or third time, a firm handshake and “it was nice to see you again” will certainly suffice. Hiring managers, recruiters and HR reps are all deluged with hundreds of emails a day. Choosing to send that email should be an all-in commitment to quality. Too many job seekers asking for another few moments of their interviewer’s time via email only to squander an opportunity to make another good impression. The unintended consequence could very well be a change to the last positive opinion an interviewer had formed about the candidate. A weak and poorly written thank you can (and has in too many situations) cost an otherwise strong candidate a job offer.

Let’s examine a thank you note that a candidate recently provided to Holla for their review and edit, before sending it to a hiring manager:

Mr. Hiring Manager,

It was great meeting you yesterday.  Thank you so much for taking time to speak with me about the Investor Relations position.  I really appreciate the clarity you provided around the expectations of the role and the ideal candidate.  I am extremely excited about the role and I would love the opportunity to be a member of your team. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Thanks,

Jill Candidate

Jill actually had done quite well on her interview. The hiring manager and his team found her knowledgeable and engaging and was impressed with the research she had done on his firm prior to the meeting. The above note shows none of the research or effort Jill put into her interview; it quite literally could have been in response to any job. When the firm’s last impression of Jill was as a bright young woman with the ability to match her experience with the opportunity, a note like this will call to question all of those qualities with under a hundred words.

A thank you note must be concise but also targeted. It should bring to the interviewer’s mind positive qualities uncovered during the interview, be they similar sector coverages or experience with oddly structured leveraged buyouts. It should contain substance but lack fluff. The candidate should seek to remind the interviewer of why they had initially agreed to see the applicant and what they had hoped to see in  him or her.

Jill sought to be engaged and responsive. Instead, she appeared generic, careless and thoughtless in her final touch with the decision maker.

Here is Holla’s rewrite:

Mr. Hiring Manager,

I wanted to thank you for meeting with me yesterday regarding the Investor Relations Position. ABC Firm is involved in exciting work within the LBO space and I am confident my analysis and deal support at XYZ Capital qualifies me technically for the role. The opportunity to focus on Oil and Gas is rare and I look forward to leveraging my prior M&A exposure in these sectors. I remain extremely interested in this opportunity am available via the contact details below to discuss the next steps in this process.

Thanks,

Jill Candidate

With 22 additional words (89 total, for those counting), Jill’s thank you note from a resume-writing manual became a targeted and exciting closing statement – a summary of skills and experience plus their relation to the job, an expression of interest in the role and a defense of her unique qualities and experiences.

Holla’s re-write also varies sentence structure. Jill’s original note begins most sentences with “I” and (sorry for being harsh here, Jill) reads like it was written by someone of far less intelligence than she really possesses.

It’s far better to send no “thank you” at all than to present yourself as someone who views it as a boring formality worthy of a canned response and no more. If a “thank you” is necessary, prepare for and execute it as you would an interview – a compelling sales pitch from a researched and accomplished professional well qualified for the role.

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